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Jul 15, 2010

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David

Good summary about stuff. Somthing that I think hinders the work of God (if such a statement is possible) but what i mean is that stuff gets people side tracked and stuff becomes a type of idolatry.

Guess we all like comfort a little too much. & God didn't call us to a life of comfort...wish I had a better perspective on stuff, since it all belongs to God in the first place.

phil_style

reminds me of the Mercedes advert currently on TV here in the UK..

"they say that as soon as you get something, you don't want it anymore...... that depends on what you get".

John

But where does the materialist world-view come from?

Like all world-views it is an extension or expression of the understanding or mis-understanding of the nature of the body--whatever the body is altogether.

The materialist world view reduces every body to the gross meat-body level of existence ONLY.

As does exoteric religion. Indeed they both share the same anti-Spiritual reductionist assumptions about what we are as human beings, our relationship to the World altogether, and our relationship to The Divine Reality. God is either completely absent or entirely other, and therefore effectively absent too.

John

The entire human world is now ruled by the point of view of scientific materialism.

Scientific materialism, combined with reductionistic exoteric religion has deprived humankind of all profundity of view relative to what we are as human beings, to the nature of the conditional world altogether, and relative to the Divine Reality.

Scientific materialism is now a global cultural program or power seeking meme, which has so effectively supported the grossly bound human motive to achieve a perfectly independent state of "self-sufficiency" that, as a result, the human collective has brought itself to the point of global destruction and universal despair (or at best a naive "realist" hopefulness).

Re global destruction: The recent Avatar film provided a suitable parable for our time. Having "created" a dying planet, the entirely godless techno-barbarian invaders were compelled by the deadly logic of their cultural script to invade more vulnerable places (as indeed power mad Westerners have always done).

At a base level the film was about the "culture" of death versus the culture of life as lived by the Navi.

It was therefore interesting to observe the completely predictable right-wing group-think response to the film.

They all loudly supported the techno-barbarian invaders-- the "culture" of death.

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